z
zeldathemes

femifeisty:

use your position of privilege to call people out 

use your position of privilege to call people out

use your position of privilege to call people out

this how you be a good ally

use the security your privilege provides you to stop hateful speech and actions 

this is how to be invested in intersectionality 

10 months ago on November 22nd | J | 33,425 notes
Tagged as: #privilege #t 

hey, everyone! ik i disappeared for a long time - a lot has been going on in my life, and it’s been hard to make time for blogging. however, i’m going to pick up this blog again and keep things running. <3 i’m really dedicated to the abortion debate and i want to keep posting and informing others

see u all soooon

10 months ago on November 22nd | J | 2 notes

tostones-de-pana:

professionalmisanthrope:

☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Asexuals can appreciate good looking people

☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Asexuals are not necessarily sexually repressed or sex-repulsed

☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Asexuals can fall in love and enter relationships

☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Asexuals can have functioning libidos without being sexually attracted to people

☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Asexuality is not necessarily the result of sexual abuse

Hey look at this

1 year ago on July 24th | J | 68,067 notes
feministmajorityfoundation:

We’ve got a clinic crisis on our hands.

feministmajorityfoundation:

We’ve got a clinic crisis on our hands.

1 year ago on July 24th | J | 4,762 notes
damnsoprochoice:

I did a thing

damnsoprochoice:

I did a thing

1 year ago on July 24th | J | 282 notes
dearjeeling:

girl (super)power smashing patriarchy!

dearjeeling:

girl (super)power smashing patriarchy!

1 year ago on July 24th | J | 6,126 notes
Tagged as: #pic 
righttochoose:

In response to this:

righttochoose:

In response to this:

image

1 year ago on July 23rd | J | 294 notes
1 year ago on July 15th | J | 49,807 notes

Random Musing: On Abortion

prochoice18:

fucksgiver:

Wait, before we begin, let’s tell a little story…I would like to examine a court ruling in a little-known case that seemingly has nothing to do with the topic of abortion.

McFall v. Shimp (1978) - PA

Robert McFall is dying.  He is diagnosed with a rare bone marrow disease, aplastic anemia.  His only hope for survival is a bone marrow transplant.  Finding a suitable donor, however, is very difficult, and usually only close family members could work.  After several tests, it is determined that only his cousin, David Shimp, is a compatible donor.

There’s a problem, however.  Shimp does not want to donate his bone marrow to McFall.  Why?  It’s highly unlikely it would kill him, although the donation process would be rather painful.  His reasons are his own, however, and he refuses to cooperate.

Desperate, McFall takes Shimp to court, urging the state to force Shimp to donate his bone marrow.  After all, Shimp’s temporary pain and loss of liberty is surely worth it, when McFall’s very life hangs in the balance, right?

It’s a difficult position.  Can the state violate a person’s right to bodily autonomy in order to save another’s life?  Can a person be compelled against his will to donate part of his body to another if it’s a matter of life or death?

No.

The state ruled in favor of Shimp.  To quote from Judge Flaherty:

The common law has consistently held to a rule which provides that one human being is under no legal compulsion to give aid or to take action to save that human being or to rescue. A great deal has been written regarding this rule which, on the surface, appears to be revolting in a moral sense. Introspection, however, will demonstrate that the rule if founded upon the very essence of our free society…

Our society, contrary to many others, has as its first principle, the respect for the individual, and that society and government exist to protect the individual from being invaded and hurt by another. Many societies adopt a contrary view which has the individual existing to serve the society as a whole. In preserving such a society as we have it is bound to happen that great moral conflicts will arise and will appear harsh in a given instance…

Morally, this decision rests with the Defendant, and, in the view of the Court, the refusal of the Defendant is morally indefensible. For our law to compel the defendant to submit to an intrusion of his body would change the very concept and principle upon which our society is founded. To do so would defeat the sanctity of the individual, and would impose a rule which would know no limits, and one could not imagine where the line would be drawn.

Now then, what does this all mean?  Well, as established, in our society, we have a right to what is called “bodily autonomy.”  Your body is your own, and no one else, no matter the circumstances, even if their life depends on it, has a right to your body, or anything within it.  You have the right to refuse the use of any part of your body to anyone at any time for any reason.  Even as a corpse, no one can take an organ from your dead body without your documented consent.

You rule your body, and everything within it, as an absolute, unquestionable dictator.  Your bone marrow, your blood, your kidneys…

Your uterus.

And here’s where we come back to abortion.  Does a fetus have a right to utilize a person’s uterus without their consent?  If it does, it has more rights than any other person alive, including McFall.  Does a woman not have the right to revoke consent to the use of her body?  If she doesn’t, she has fewer rights than Shimp did, or even a corpse.

It doesn’t matter when the fetus is “alive.”  McFall was alive.  It doesn’t matter when it can feel pain.  McFall was dying in pain.  It doesn’t matter whether or not it masturbates in the womb.  I’m willing to bet McFall was in the 95% of men who masturbate.

What matters is this: IF YOU ARE DEPENDENT UPON THE USE OF ANOTHER PERSON’S BODY TO LIVE, YOU ARE ALSO DEPENDENT UPON THEIR CONTINUOUS CONSENT TO USE THEIR BODY, WHICH THEY CAN REVOKE AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON.

Bless this post. Only good thing I’ve read all week. Thanks :)

1 year ago on July 15th | J | 533 notes
1 year ago on July 15th | J | 16,062 notes